If this important part of attending holiday celebrations causes you stress, you are definitely not the only one.

By Lauren Phillips
December 06, 2018

On typical days, getting dressed in a clean, moderately coordinated outfit that's also flattering can feel like a struggle. Getting dressed for special occasions—like, say, holiday parties—where outfits might be photographed and posted online can be even more stressful.

RELATED: Demystifying the Party Dress Code for Women and Men

In fact, according to Finery’s State of Women’s Closets survey, two-thirds of women stress over getting dressed for a holiday event, and some even report feeling “extremely stressed” getting dressed for a holiday gathering. Finery—a wardrobe concierge service that can keep track of what all is in the closet, offer new styling ideas, and more—asked 1,000 women about their outfit-picking conundrums, and it turns out that almost everyone struggles with turning what’s in the closet into outfits to be proud of. (Maybe putting a closet organizing checklist to good use can help with that.)

A majority of women—67 percent—admit to resorting to buying new outfits for different holiday events and occasions, rather than search the depths of their closets for a rarely worn cocktail dress that could do the trick. That’s not much of a surprise, though, when 61 percent of women think they have nothing to wear at least once a week. This belief might be one of the reasons almost all women—96 percent, according to the survey—spend up to one hour getting dressed in the morning.

Whether the stressor behind getting dressed is not understanding the dress code (this guide might be able to help), not finding anything appropriate in the closet, or just misplaced tensions about the event and what might happen there, it’s clear that something needs to be done. Next time a large gathering rolls around, take a moment to figure out what, exactly, might be causing stress and work to alleviate it for future events. Wouldn’t sipping wine with friends, neighbors, coworkers, or acquaintances feel better without a minor, stress-induced meltdown beforehand?